Inspection formats

The eCMID system includes two inspection formats, with indicative usage cases below. However, it is for each vessel operator, client and inspector to agree the most appropriate format for each circumstance.

Each format is regularly reviewed and updated, reflecting regulatory and technological developments, analysis of findings from the current issue plus feedback from the eCMID user community. The latest issue, as displayed on the eCMID website homepage, should always be used for a new inspection.

eCMID

The Common Marine Inspection Document (IMCA M 149), originally published in print form in 1998, is the basis for the modern eCMID inspection.This template should be used as a basis for inspecting any type of vessel of 500grt and more and/or 24m or more in length.AVI accreditation with ‘eCMID General’ endorsement is required to perform eCMID inspections. Seventeen supplements, based on vessel type and/or operation, are currently available and should be selected where relevant to a vessel. Additional accreditation is required by inspectors for certain supplements.

  • Dynamically positioned (DP) vessels
  • Anchor handling vessels (AHVs)
  • Offshore supply vessels (OSVs)
  • LNG fuelled vessels
  • Standby vessels  (SBVs) (emergency response rescue vessels (ERRVs))
  • Survey vessels (including offshore seismic survey)
  • Diving support vessels
  • Pipe lay and cable lay vessels
  • Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) and remotely operated vehicles (ROVs)
  • Helicopter operations
  • Accommodation vessels
  • Jack-up vessels
  • Heavy lift vessels
  • Oil recovery vessels
  • Barges (non self propelled)
  • Gravel discharge, dredgers and trenching
  • Vessel reactivation from lay-up

File type icon Download a review copy of IMCA M 149 (eCMID Issue 11) – not valid for upload

eMISW

The Marine Inspection for Small Workboats (IMCA M 189) was added to the eCMID system as the eMISW in 2013. This document may be used as a basis for inspecting any vessel less than 500 gross tonnage and/or less than 24m – vessels which are, therefore, not required to comply with the International Safety Management (ISM) or the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) codes, although the principles outlined within the two codes are worth following.In this document ‘small workboat’ means a small vessel in commercial use for purpose other than sport or pleasure, including a dedicated pilot vessel.  These small workboats could be used for various appropriate tasks such as inshore survey, repair of remote equipment, shallow water air dive support, construction support, dredgers and personnel transfer. Five supplements, based on vessel type and/or operation, are currently available and should be selected where relevant to a vessel.

  • Dynamic positioning
  • Towing
  • Diving
  • Anchor handling
  • Barges (non self propelled)

File type icon Download a review copy of IMCA M 189 (eMISW Issue 4) – not valid for upload